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Bolonge Park, France, showing apartment blocks around a green square space with canala
Boulogne Park, Paris, France | Photo: Courtesy of L’Agence TER

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

About the City Edge Project

Raised pedestrian bridge with landscaping over train line
Paleisbrug, 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands | Photo: Jannes Linders
View of quay side in Nordhavn, Copenhagen. Old industrial harbour converted to a modern residential area with apartments.
Nordhavn, Copenhagen | Photo: Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST
Unique in Ireland, the City Edge Project is a transformative initiative, re-imagining the Naas Road, Ballymount and Park West areas in Dublin. Creating a new urban quarter, it has the potential for 40,000 new homes and 75,000 jobs, making it one of the largest regeneration schemes in Europe.
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Download Project Overview Document - September 2021

What is the City Edge Project?

The City Edge Project represents the most significant housing and economic opportunity ever undertaken in the Dublin Region and has the potential to be one of the largest and most transformational regeneration projects in Europe.

Located in the Naas Road, Ballymount and Park West areas of Dublin, this 700 hectare area of land is currently well served by public transport and located in close proximity to Dublin City Centre. Today the area is home to a thriving employment base with 1,500 businesses and some 25,500 employees, along with 5,000 residents living in well-established communities. Over time this area could be more intensely used with the potential to provide a new urban quarter accommodating up to 40,000 homes and 75,000 jobs.

Map of City Edge Project map area with current land use marked as Shedspace, Open space, Residential or Other

In response to National Policy, which seeks to make better use of land close to cities, Dublin City Council and South Dublin County Council are working together to prepare a framework for the future growth of this area. Work on this commenced in July 2020 and is funded under the Government’s Urban Regeneration and Development Fund (URDF). The current Phase of the Project, (Phase 1) has two stages:

  1. Baseline Analysis and Emerging Preferred Scenario which have been completed.
  2. Strategic Framework, which is currently being prepared.

The Strategic Framework will set out a high level strategy for the sustainable development of the area, into the future.

View of quay side in Nordhavn, Copenhagen. Old industrial harbour converted to a modern residential area with apartments.
Nordhavn, Copenhagen | Photo: Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST
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City Edge Project Vision

The emerging vision for the City Edge Project is:

To create a new mixed use and climate resilient high density urban quarter in the city, where the citizens of the Greater Dublin Area will be able to access affordable homes, live close to where they work, in an area home to outstanding public amenities and public transport services. Building upon its rich history of employment, the area will support the retention, consolidation and the creation of new employment opportunities, culminating in the creation of a self-sustaining and integrated part of the city, where family, community, visitors and the economy can prosper in a distinctive Dublin setting.
View of Bolonge Park, France, showing apartment blocks around a green square space with canala
Boulogne Park, Paris, France | Photo: Courtesy of L’Agence TER

Emerging Objectives

Liveable City
Follow 10-minute city principles

Economy
Scope for up to 65,000-75,000 jobs

Housing
Homes for up to 75,000 – 85,000 people

Environment
Target 50% green cover

Movement
Development of active and public transport

Character & Urban Design
Knit into existing neighbourhoods

Sustainability
Fast-track to zero carbon and zero waste

Deliverability & Credibility
Deliverable and credible framework

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City Edge Area Map

The Design Team

An international urban design and urban planning led team was selected, by way of competition, to carry out a detailed study of the project area and to produce a vision for how this part of Dublin City can develop over the coming 30+ years. This work will consider how the regeneration of the City Edge Study Area can support delivery of much-needed new homes to cater for the various needs of our growing population, can help Dublin become a climate resilient City, can accommodate the next generation of employment and can provide liveable spaces that connect seamlessly with the surrounding neighbourhoods. The project team, which includes a wide-ranging suite of experts and consultants, is led by Maccreanor Lavington, who are award winning architects and urban designers based in London and Rotterdam.

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People + Place

Work to Date – Key Findings

During detailed investigations of the Study Area some key findings, that will help guide the future development of the area, have emerged.

Existing Employment
The City Edge Study Area has a diverse mix of mainly industrial, commercial and employment uses that sustains approximately 25,500 jobs across some 1,500 different businesses. This accounts for 4% of Dublin’s employment and contributes approximately €1.98bn per year to the economy. These existing businesses and jobs are a cornerstone of the Dublin economy and are key to the continued success of our City.

Future Employment
However, there are opportunities to intensify land uses in this part of Dublin and to provide new employment space to potentially cater for up to 75,000 jobs. The very nature of how we work is changing and so too are the range of different business sectors. There are growing opportunities in Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Health, Logistics and Storage, Financial Technology (FinTech), Aviation and Travel Tech and Construction will be key employment growth sectors that could play a formative role in the future of the Naas Road area and in making Dublin a more resilient economy. There is a mix of uses across the Study Area with some of the major employers in the Study Area including: Diageo, DHL, Iarnrod Eireann, An Post, and FBD Insurance.

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Transport and Movement
The Study Area is in close proximity to the City Centre and with the right level and type of public transport could provide a huge opportunity for creating a Liveable City based on the principles of walking, cycling and public transport. Today the Study Area is well served by public transport – the Luas, the Kildare Railway Line and frequent bus services as well as regional and national roads. But there is scope to significantly improve active and public transport infrastructure including new rail and Luas station, new bus routes and cycle lanes to support the existing and future population.

Homes
There is an existing residential population of just over 5,000 people comprising approximately 1,600 households, peppered throughout the Study Area. These communities are well established, many in place since before the current industrial businesses emerged. However, given the proximity of these lands to the City, there is huge scope to provide much needed new homes that are accessible for people of all ages, abilities and income levels and that offer people choice, about where and how they want to live and homes that ultimately meet the increasing needs of our city’s growing population.

Residential street in Ballymount area showing houses and cars parked on street

Place
A successful and integrated new community is also dependent on the creation of a place where people want to live and work and socialise. Whilst homes, jobs and transport are central to this, we also need the complementary measures of new schools, parks, shops as well as health, leisure, cultural, sports and community facilities.

At 700 hectares in size, the Study Area is home to a plethora of hidden gems that can be unearthed to become focal points for the future of the place. The Grand Canal, the Camac River and Drimnagh Castle are important identity and amenity features that can be also promoted and integrated as part of this regeneration. The opportunity and challenge is to create a place where people want to live and work and that will knit together our existing and new communities. The approach is to develop a framework to guide the future development of the Study Area based on the principles of the Liveable City that embed climate resilient measures from the outset of the regeneration programme.

Challenges
In realising the scale of opportunities this part of Dublin presents there are also significant challenges that need to be overcome such as divided and multiple land ownership; separate existing planning permissions for approximately 4,000 dwellings in and around the Study Area; the risk of flooding; overhead power lines; traffic congestion; barriers created by roads; sites that are contaminated and accommodate that contain dangerous substances together with the need for significant investment in transport, parks, amenities and climate change resilience.

Tree lined pedestrian path in the Ballymount area
Canalside path close to study area
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Contact us

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01 4149098

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